Posts Tagged ‘swine flu’

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April 14th, 2012

Podcast 151: Most people above age 10 have at least some cross-reactive antibodies to variant influenza

Influenza A (H3N2)v — a novel flu virus that emerged last summer and shows signs of being able to transmit itself from person to person — is our topic this week. The virus carries genes from swine and avian flu viruses, and the few cases found in the U.S. all made complete recovery. We talk with CDC […]


May 8th, 2009

Podcast 42: An interview with Danielle Ofri — author, editor, clinician.

We talk about writing with Danielle Ofri, editor of the Bellevue Literary Review, author of “Singular Intimacies: Becoming a Doctor at Bellevue” and “Incidental Findings: Lessons from My Patients in the Art of Medicine,” and an attending physician at Bellevue. I figured you could do with less information about influenza. If you’ve got a reaction, call […]


May 4th, 2009

Podcast 41: A repeat of an interview with Dr. Anne Schuchat of the CDC on childhood immunization levels.

Your host is struggling with an overload of pollen and its attendant insults to his immune system. Or maybe it’s the dreaded swine flu. In any event, Dr. Anne Schuchat gave an interesting interview on childhood immunization levels in those halcyon pre-porcine-obsessed days of September 2008, and I’m repeating it for you this week. This week’s links: […]


April 25th, 2009

Podcast 40: Tight control in type 2 diabetes — time to loosen up? A conversation with Mayo’s Victor Montori.

The Annals of Internal Medicine published an intriguing essay online last week about tight glycemic control in type 2 diabetes. Its authors argue that we’ve got it all wrong: imposing tight controls is only subjecting patients to stresses — related to the complexities and costs of treatment — that make control less likely to succeed. […]


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