Articles matching the ‘statins’ Category

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November 1st, 2019

Podcast 240: Overuse of statins for primary prevention of cardiovascular events

Running time: 23 minutes Paula Byrne set out to understand what the available data tell us about how many people are taking statins for primary prevention — and how much good is it likely doing them? Also, how do you discuss their possible harms and benefits with patients? Links: Paula Byrne and colleagues’ analysis in The BMJ Kausik Ray […]


November 12th, 2013

Podcast 169: New guidelines on cardiovascular disease prevention

 Running time: 11 minutes The American Heart Association/American College of Cardiology have released four sets of guidelines — all aimed at the lowering of risk for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. For perspective, we’ve asked Harlan Krumholz, editor-in-chief of NEJM Journal Watch Cardiology and CardioExchange to chat. Links: Risk calculator (free) CardioExchange (free) Circulation homepage New York Times piece by Krumholz on […]


April 1st, 2011

Podcast 117: Atorvastatin and new-onset diabetes

Statins, according to a 2010 meta-analysis in Lancet, are associated with a slightly increased risk for new-onset type 2 diabetes. One, atorvastatin (marketed as Lipitor), was underrepresented in that analysis. Researchers, along with the manufacturer, decided to have a look at data from three trials to see whether atorvastatin also conferred that risk. And, indeed […]


July 1st, 2010

Podcast 94: What does a new meta-analysis tell us about statins and primary prevention?

A meta-analysis of 11 studies encompassing more than 60,000 subjects finds that statins don’t lower all-cause mortality in people without cardiovascular disease. One editorialist calls the study, just published in the Archives of Internal Medicine, “the cleanest and most complete meta-analysis of pharmacological lipid lowering for primary prevention.” One of the study’s principal authors, Kausik K. […]


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