Posts Tagged ‘elders’

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May 28th, 2010

Podcast 89: Glasses aren’t just for reading any more. Listen in to how they can help the elderly avoid falls.

Glasses — when did you start wearing them? They serve to help us do more than just read the newspaper, according to our conversational guest today. Prof. Stephen Lord of Sydney’s Prince of Wales Medical Research Institute and his coauthors write in BMJ this week about trying to encourage elderly wearers of multifocal lenses to […]


May 17th, 2009

Podcast 43: An interview with Martha Gulati on her research into the cardiovascular risks faced by symptomatic women who have normal angiograms.

Northwestern’s Martha Gulati has just published a paper in Archives of Internal Medicine about the hazards of treating symptomatic women with normal angiograms as if they had a benign prognosis. We’ll talk with her after a look at the news, and a reminder that you can really help Clinical Conversations with your feedback. The place […]


March 20th, 2009

Podcast 35: Clinical Conversations reprises an interview with Mary Tinetti about falls in the elderly.

Clinical Conversations, the podcast formerly known as Admitting Diagnosis, offers this week a reprise interview from last summer: Mary Tinetti talks about preventing falls in the elderly. Call 1-617-440-4374 to leave a suggestion. Let’s hear from you. Links: Prostate Cancer Screening Controversy Not Dead Yet Diabetics and Patients over 65 Show Bigger Survival Benefit from CABG […]


July 18th, 2008

Podcast 8: News and interview with Dr. Mary Tinetti, Gladys Phillips Crofoot Professor of Medicine and Epidemiology and Public Health, Yale

We talk with Mary Tinetti about falls in the elderly and how to prevent them. Journal Watch links It’s Safe to Eat Tomatoes Again, FDA Says U.S. Measles Hits 11-Year High – Most Cases Were Unvaccinated Which Lipids Mark MI Risk Best? Elderly Benefit from Joint Replacement, but Many Never Get the Option


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