Articles matching the ‘Public health’ Category

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January 16th, 2020

Podcast 248: “Hotspotting” didn’t work in its home town — why?

The process of identifying super-users of healthcare and reducing the frequency of their hospitalizations — so-called “hotspotting” — was subjected to a randomized, controlled trial in Camden, NJ, the birthplace of the idea. It failed there. Those in the intervention group had a readmission rate within 6 months that was statistically identical to those getting usual care. […]


November 7th, 2019

Podcast 241: Talking about guns with patients

Running time: 18 minutes In California, Garen Wintemute and his group find evidence that people are willing to discuss gun safety with their clinicians, especially when there may be danger of harm present. That willingness extends across gun owners and non-owners. So why aren’t more clinicians doing it? The findings appear in Health Affairs. Links to the article […]


June 11th, 2019

Podcast 226: What we need to talk about when we talk about health

Length: 18 minutes Sandro Galea, dean of Boston University’s School of Public Health, has written a new book. It’s called “Well: What we need to talk about when we talk about health,” and it’s the centerpiece of our discussion. Dr. Galea, who trained as an emergency physician, believes that health is a public good and thus worthy […]


August 14th, 2018

Podcast 223: What are the implications of the BP guidelines?

If adopted, last December’s ACC/AHA guidelines on what pressure levels signal hypertension would label almost two thirds of the U.S. population between ages 45 and 75 as having the condition. The number of people who would be candidates for treatment would almost double — from 8 million to about 15 million. What are the implications of […]


April 4th, 2018

Podcast 220: Mumps outbreaks — blame waning protection, not new viruses or bad vaccines

Mumps outbreaks keep happening, even among vaccinated groups. Why? Our guest, Joseph Lewnard, and his coauthor, Yonstan Grad, probed studies of mumps vaccine efficacy carried out over five decades. They show that the fault, dear clinician, is not in our vaccines or new viral strains, but in ourselves. Our bodies slowly lose their immune response after […]


June 10th, 2017

Podcast 208: How inequality kills — David Ansell talks with us about his new book

Dr. David Ansell, a professor of medicine at Rush University Medical Center in Chicago, discusses his new book, “The Death Gap: How inequality kills.” What’s the death gap? Look at it this way: you’re getting on the Chicago Transit Authority’s Blue Line at “The Loop” in downtown, where the average life expectancy is 85 yrs. Go […]


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