Posts Tagged ‘FDA’

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August 9th, 2009

Podcast 52: Screening for intimate-partner violence doesn’t seem productive or very protective. What’s a concerned clinician to do?

We talk with two authors of a JAMA study that indicates that such screening doesn’t accomplish the ultimate goal: protecting the patient from further abuse. Our guests have some advice. This week’s news links: Vertebroplasty No Better Than Sham Procedure in Osteoporotic Fractures Researchers Advise Labor Induction for Women with Mild Hypertensive Disease Late in Pregnancy TNF-Blockers […]


July 19th, 2009

Podcast 50: A re-podcast of an interview from February regarding the FDA’s plans for tightening regulations on opioid use.

This week the FDA approved a form of fentanyl that can be administered through the buccal mucosa — but its label carries boxed warnings. And two weeks ago, the opioid propoxyphene got boxed warnings on its Darvon and Darvocet formulations. The FDA is trying to regulate the opioids more closely, reminding prescribers and users of […]


June 19th, 2009

Podcast 46: Does Genetic Testing for Clotting Mutations Matter? An interview with Jodi Segal of Johns Hopkins

You’d think that a widely-ordered test would play a part in management and outcome, but two clotting mutations seem exceptions to that rule. Although often requested, the FDA-approved tests for Factor V Leiden and G20210A mutations don’t seem to figure greatly in case management of venous thromboembolism, at least according to the published literature. Dr. […]


April 25th, 2009

Podcast 40: Tight control in type 2 diabetes — time to loosen up? A conversation with Mayo’s Victor Montori.

The Annals of Internal Medicine published an intriguing essay online last week about tight glycemic control in type 2 diabetes. Its authors argue that we’ve got it all wrong: imposing tight controls is only subjecting patients to stresses — related to the complexities and costs of treatment — that make control less likely to succeed. […]


February 28th, 2009

Podcast 32: Reprise of a June 2008 interview with Larry Allen from Duke, in which he talks about patients’ estimates of their life expectancy, compared with what disease models predict.

We’ve run into a scheduling problem with the person we wanted to talk with. We’ll try again next week, because his views are intriguing and I’m guessing you’d rather have intriguing than ho-hum. However, so that you won’t have wasted your time downloading the podcast, I’ve reprised an interview from last June, when few of […]


February 16th, 2009

Podcast 30: Dr. Roger Chou of Oregon Health Sciences University talks about recent guidelines for opioid use in non-cancer pain and reflects on the FDA’s recent announcement of tighter regulation on use of the drugs.

The FDA announced an early-March meeting with manufacturers of opioids to discuss how problems with the drugs’ overuse and abuse might be addressed. We talk with an author of guidelines just published (and freely available) in the Journal of Pain that coincidentally address some of these concerns. Then, of course, there’s the usual news roundup, […]


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