Articles matching the ‘Cost-Effectiveness Studies’ Category

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August 8th, 2019

Podcast 228: Hematuria — should the workup include imaging?

Matthew Nielsen and colleagues found almost 80 diagnostic algorithms for working up a finding of hematuria. From these, they chose five representative approaches, ranging from those based on the patients’ risk factors to more aggressive ones that stress CT imaging for all. Using a 100,000-patient simulated cohort, Nielsen’s group found that more intensive imaging found more […]


June 3rd, 2015

Podcast 175: “Understanding Value-Based Healthcare” — A Discussion with the Authors of an Important New Book

Running time: 26 minutes “Understanding Value-Based Healthcare,” published in April by McGraw-Hill is today’s focus. Drs. Christopher Moriates, of the University of California, San Francisco; Vineet Arora, of the University of Chicago; and Neel Shah of Harvard Medical — the book’s authors — discuss its straightforward approach to valuing patient outcomes foremost. The discussion ranges over their reasons […]


October 25th, 2009

Podcast 62: A conversation with Jane Kim about cost-effectiveness of vaccinating women with HPV vaccine after age 30.

The FDA seems set to announce a decision about vaccinating women past age 25 for HPV. A paper in the Annals of Internal Medicine this week indicates that such a strategy wouldn’t be cost-effective. Don’t be put off by “cost-effectiveness” or by the fact that we actually discuss “QALY”s. It’s all good. We’ve got Harvard […]


June 29th, 2009

Podcast 47: Total knee arthroplasty’s cost-effectiveness — a conversation with Elena Losina

Who knew that discussing QALYs could be so enjoyable? Dr. Elena Losina guides the interviewer through the thicket of cost-effectiveness and points to resources that keep track of the cost-effectiveness of most procedures. This is all done in the context of discussing her paper in Archives of Internal Medicine on total knee arthroplasty. This week’s […]


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