-

Archive for May, 2010

RSS

May 28th, 2010

Podcast 89: Glasses aren’t just for reading any more. Listen in to how they can help the elderly avoid falls.

Glasses — when did you start wearing them? They serve to help us do more than just read the newspaper, according to our conversational guest today. Prof. Stephen Lord of Sydney’s Prince of Wales Medical Research Institute and his coauthors write in BMJ this week about trying to encourage elderly wearers of multifocal lenses […]


May 21st, 2010

Podcast 88: Weighing the benefits of endovascular versus open repair in abdominal aortic aneurysm.

The New England Journal of Medicine carries several studies comparing the long-term outcomes of endovascular versus open repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms. Tying all those studies together is an editorial by Dr. K. Craig Kent of the University of Wisconsin. We’ve got him as our guest this week. Have a listen. Interview-related links: K. […]


May 16th, 2010

Podcast 87: After this week’s news, we reprise an interview from last December on pharyngitis in adolescents and young adults.

Dr. Robert Centor of the University of Alabama at Birmingham believes that the paradigm for treating pharyngitis in adolescents and young adults must change. Listen to our conversation and hear why. Here are this week’s links: Interview-related links: Commentary Urges ‘Expanding the Diagnostic Paradigm of Pharyngitis’ in Young People Robert Centor’s blog — “Medrants” […]


May 7th, 2010

Podcast 86: Prompt follow-up after discharge for heart failure reduces early-readmission rates.

Why wouldn’t you want your hospital to lower its rate of early readmissions for heart failure by 15%? We talk with Dr. Adrian Hernandez about his examination of Medicare data from over 200 hospitals, how the hospitals vary widely in the rates at which their patients are followed up within a week of discharge […]


May 2nd, 2010

Podcast 85: B vitamins lower homocysteine levels, so why don’t they retard the progression of diabetic nephropathy?

A surprise finding: homocysteine is supposed to be a factor in vascular inflammation, but lowering hyperhomocysteinemia in patients with diabetic nephropathy actually accelerated the decline of  their GFRs. What gives? We have a conversation with Dr. J. David Spence, whose results were just published in JAMA. Interview-related link: JAMA paper on the effect of […]


Clinical Conversations

About the Podcast

To subscribe: Subscribe on iTunes

To have your comment included in a future podcast, call 617-440-4374. Please leave your name, number, and the podcast ID number.